Golden Globes 2016 Wrap-Up: What Went Right and Wrong

0

IMG_2142Preston Barta // Editor

Underdogs take home gold

The 73rd annual Golden Globes, hosted by Ricky Gervais, landed in Los Angeles last night with several big moments bringing attendees to their feet.

As usual, Gervais set the tone for the evening with a series of vulgar zingers directed at some of the biggest stars in Hollywood. Taking aim at everyone from Caitlyn Jenner, to Ben Affleck and his infidelity, to an impromptu profanity-filled chat with Mel Gibson, Gervais doesn’t care. Whether you like his often shocking comedic jabs or prefer the more sharp wit of last year’s hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, there’s no denying Gervais can hold one’s attention.

Perhaps one of the biggest truths Gervais quipped was about how the Golden Globes don’t matter. “If you do win tonight, remember that no one cares about that award as much as you do,” Gervais said. “Don’t get emotional. It’s embarrassing.” Yeah. Perhaps he’s right: It is a made up award by a group of pseudo journalists that allow publicists to tell studios and others their client is a Golden Globe winner/nominee [Shrugs shoulders].

Alejandro G. Inarritu and Leonardo DiCaprio were high spirits backstage. Photo courtesy of Jim Smeal/ Rex Shutterstock.

Alejandro G. Inarritu and Leonardo DiCaprio were high spirits backstage. Photo courtesy of Jim Smeal/ Rex Shutterstock.

In terms of awards, the night proved successful for many television shows and films. Shockingly, SPOTLIGHT was left in the dark, while THE BIG SHORT came up, well, short. THE REVENANT, its director (Alejandro González Iñárritu) and leading star (Leonardo DiCaprio) nabbed the top prizes of the evening for Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actor in the drama category (color me happy, as THE REVENANT was my No. 1 of 2015).

Another film about desperate man left for dead and fighting for survival, THE MARTIAN was awarded Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy. “Thank you very much. Comedy? But, anyway, I’m very grateful for that,” said director Ridley Scott. Comedy or not, THE MARTIAN was a hell of a film and it was great to see the Globes lean towards quality filmmaking.

Brie Larson deservedly won Best Actress in a movie drama for her role as a resourceful young mother in ROOM. While Hollywood darling Jennifer Lawrence won best actress in a comedy film for David O. Russell’s JOY, which was quite a shock considering most predicted her friend Amy Schumer would snag it for TRAINWRECK.

In a sentimental win that earned him a standing ovation from fellow actors, veteran actor Sylvester Stallone was named best supporting actor in a film for CREED. Stallone has earned praise for reinventing his iconic Rocky Balboa character as an aging ex-fighter who comes out of retirement to train a young boxer. “This is incredible. Last time I was here, that was 1977. I was kind of hit by a tumbleweed. It was a long time ago,” said Stallone. “It’s a different situation and the view is so beautiful now.”

The best supporting actress prize, and the first award of the evening, went to Kate Winslet for STEVE JOBS, which also won Best Screenplay for Aaron Sorkin and his wonderfully talky script.

While FARGO received no love, USA’s hit television series MR. ROBOT took home some top honors, including Best TV Series – Drama and Best Supporting Actor (Christian Slater), leaving the heavily-favored GAME OF THRONES seated. Lesser known shows (you probably had to google these afterwards) such as WOLF HALL and MOZART IN THE JUNGLE also had a great evening, winning Best TV Movie or Limited Series and Best TV Series, Comedy.

The Golden Globes this year were entertaining from start to finish, which was mostly due to Gervais’ controversial wisecracks throughout. Hilarity ensued as the alcohol continued to flow freely along with funny gags, emotional speeches and quite a few surprises, proving that this awards season has been anything but predictable. Until then, it’s still anybody’s game.

A complete list of nominees and winners is below. All the nominated and Globe-winning films are in theaters now, as they are re-released for Oscar consideration.

Best Motion Picture, Drama
Winner: THE REVENANT
CAROL
MAD MAX: FURY ROAD
SPOTLIGHT
ROOM

Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy
Winner: THE MARTIAN
THE BIG SHORT
JOY
SPY
TRAINWRECK

Best Director
Winner: Alejandro González Iñárritu, THE REVENANT
Todd Haynes, CAROL
Tom McCarthy, SPOTLIGHT
George Miller, MAD MAX: FURY ROAD
Ridley Scott, THE MARTIAN

Best Actor, Drama
Winner: Leonardo DiCaprio, THE REVENANT
Bryan Cranston, TRUMBO
Michael Fassbender, STEVE JOBS
Eddie Redmayne, THE DANISH GIRL
Will Smith, CONCUSSION

Best Actress, Drama
Winner: Brie Larson, ROOM
Cate Blanchett, CAROL
Rooney Mara, CAROL
Saoirse Ronan, BROOKLYN
Alicia Vikander, THE DANISH GIRL

Best Actor, Musical or Comedy
Winner: Matt Damon, THE MARTIAN
Christian Bale, THE BIG SHORT
Steve Carell, THE BIG SHORT
Al Pacino, DANNY COLLINS
Mark Ruffalo, INFINITELY POLAR BEAR

Best Actress, Musical or Comedy
Winner: Jennifer Lawrence, JOY
Melissa McCarthy, SPY
Amy Schumer, TRAINWRECK
Maggie Smith, THE LADY IN THE VAN
Lily Tomlin, GRANDMA

Best Supporting Actor
Winner: Sylvester Stallone, CREED
Paul Dano, LOVE & MERCY
Idris Elba, BEASTS OF NO NATION
Mark Rylance, BRIDGE OF SPIES
Michael Shannon, 99 HOMES

Best Supporting Actress
Winner: Kate Winslet, STEVE JOBS
Jane Fonda, YOUTH
Jennifer Jason Leigh, THE HATEFUL EIGHT
Helen Mirren, TRUMBO
Alicia Vikander, EX MACHINA

Best Screenplay
Winner: STEVE JOBS
THE BIG SHORT
THE HATEFUL EIGHT
ROOM
SPOTLIGHT

Best Animated Feature
Winner: INSIDE OUT
ANOMALISA
THE GOOD DINOSAUR
THE PEANUTS MOVIE
SHAUN THE SHEEP MOVIE

Best Motion Picture, Foreign Language
Winner: SON OF SAUL
THE BRAND NEW TESTAMENT
THE CLUB
THE FENCER
MUSTANG

Best Original Score, Motion Picture
Winner: Ennio Morricone, THE HATEFUL EIGHT
Carter Burwell, CAROL
Alexandre Desplat, THE DANISH GIRL
Daniel Pemberton, STEVE JOBS
Ryuichi Sakamoto and Alva Noto, THE REVENANT

Best Original Song, Motion Picture
Winner: “Writing’s on the Wall,” SPECTRE
“Love Me Like You Do,” FIFTY SHADES OF GREY
“One Kind of Love,” LOVE & MERCY
“See You Again,” FURIOUS 7
“Simple Song #3,” YOUTH

Best TV Series, Drama
Winner: MR. ROBOT
EMPIRE
GAME OF THRONES
NARCOS
OUTLANDER

Best TV Series, Comedy
Winner: MOZART IN THE JUNGLE
CASUAL
ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK
SILICON VALLEY
TRANSPARENT

Best TV Movie or Limited Series
Winner: WOLF HALL
AMERICAN CRIME
AMERICAN HORROR STORY: HOTEL
FARGO
FLESH AND BONE

Best Actress in a TV Series, Drama
Winner: Taraji P. Henson, EMPIRE
Caitriona Balfe, OUTLANDER
Viola Davis, HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER
Eva Green, PENNY DREADFUL
Robin Wright, HOUSE OF CARDS

Best Actor in a TV Series, Drama
Winner: Jon Hamm, MAD MEN
Rami Malek, MR. ROBOT
Wagner Moura, NARCOS
Bob Odenkirk, BETTER CALL SAUL
Liev Schreiber, RAY DONOVAN

Best Actor in a TV Series, Comedy
Winner: Gael Garcia Bernal, MOZART IN THE JUNGLE
Aziz Ansari, MASTER OF NONE
Rob Lowe, THE GRINDER
Patrick Stewart, BLUNT TALK
Jeffrey Tambor, TRANSPARENT

Best Actress in a TV Series, Comedy or Musical
Winner: Rachel Bloom, CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND
Jamie Lee Curtis, SCREAM QUEENS
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, VEEP
Gina Rodriguez, JANE THE VIRGIN
Lily Tomlin, GRACE & FRANKIE

Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Limited Series or TV Movie
Winner: Maura Tierney, THE AFFAIR
Uzo Aduba, ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK
Joanne Froggatt, DOWNTON ABBEY
Regina King, AMERICAN CRIME
Judith Light, TRANSPARENT

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Limited Series or TV Movie
Winner: Christian Slater, MR. ROBOT
Alan Cumming, THE GOOD WIFE
Damian Lewis, WOLF HALL
Ben Mendelsohn, BLOODLINE
Tobias Menzies, OUTLANDER

Best Actor in a Limited Series or TV Movie
Winner: Oscar Isaac, SHOW ME A HERO
Idris Elba, LUTHER
David Oyelowo, NIGHTINGALE
Mark Rylance, WOLF HALL
Patrick Wilson, FARGO

Best Actress in a Limited Series or TV Movie
Winner: Lady Gaga, AMERICAN HORROR STORY: HOTEL
Kirsten Dunst, FARGO
Sarah Hay, FLESH AND BONE
Felicity Huffman, AMERICAN CRIME
Queen Latifah, BESSIE

About author

Preston Barta

Hello, there! My name is Preston Barta, and I am the features editor of Fresh Fiction and senior film critic at the Denton Record-Chronicle. My cinematic love story began where I was born: off planet on the isolated desert world of the Jakku system. It's there I passed the time scavenging for loose parts with my good friend Rey. One day I found an old film projector and a dusty reel of the 1975 film JAWS. It rocked my world so much that I left my kinfolk in the rearview (I so miss their morning cups of green milk) to pursue my dreams of writing about film. It wasn't long until I met two gents who said they would give me a lift. I can't recall their names, but one was an older man who liked to point a lot and the other was a tall, hairy fella. They got me as far as one of Jupiter's moons where we crossed paths with the U.S.S. Enterprise. Some pointy-eared bastard said I was clear to come aboard. He saw that I was clutching my beloved shark movie and invited me to the "moving pictures room" where he was screening the 1993 film JURASSIC PARK to his crew. He said my life would be much more prosperous if I were familiar with more work by the god named Steven Spielberg. From there, my love for cinema blossomed. Once we reached planet Earth, everything changed. I found the small town of Denton, TX, and was welcomed into the Barta family. They showed me the writings of local film critic Boo Allen. He became my hero and caused me to chase a degree in film and journalism. After my studies at graduate of the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, I met some film critics who showed me the ropes and got me into my first press screening: 2011's THE GREEN LANTERN. Don't worry; I recovered just fine. MAD MAX: FURY ROAD was only four years away.